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Hot Mess!

Episode 5

Excerpt of Hot Mess! Episode 4 featuring Charles Joseph Smith, Carole McCurdy, Yumiko Yoshioka, Kikù Hibino, M_m<M and nulltopia

Marcy Rae Henry, SheenRu Yong, Shoshana Green, Meenakshi Marchione, and Harlan Rosen

Together, we explore promiscuously inventive hybrids of tech media film music theater noise talk show jazz low brow glitch channelling queer family dance score improvs visual collage…either way it’s riveting and in the moment- these five artists are making stunning works individually and as a collective in Hot Mess! fashion: simultaneously live-streamed and experienced in person. Audience and artists alike can expect to flex VR and interpersonal skills while also adapting to new tools, technology and experiences. This space becomes anything we want it to be.

Saturday, May 28 @Elastic Arts 
Two Sets 4:20 & 8pm CST

3429 W. Diversey #208 or streaming online elasticarts.org/streaming
(check the world clock for your zone)
FB event page

Marcy Rae Henry es una Latina de Los Borderlands who studied stuff in Spain, India, Burma and Nepal, hitchhiked around France, Spain and Portugal and motorbiked through the Middle East. Her writing has received a Chicago Community Arts Assistance Grant, an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship, a Pushcart Prize nomination and first prize in Ember Chasm’s 2021 Novel Excerpt Contest. Her writing and visual art appear in The Columbia Review, carte blanche, Epiphany, The Southern Review, Cauldron Anthology and The Brooklyn Review, among others. DoubleCross Press will publish her chapbook ‘We Are Primary Colors’ this year.  www.marcyraehenry.com

SheenRu Yong is a dance artist, choreographer, and the initiator of body portal theatre. She began dancing at Wesleyan University and then trained in New York City and Taipei, where she was commissioned and inspired to choreograph evening-length shows, site-specific works, and community-based performances. While earning her MFA in Choreography at the Taipei National University of the Arts, she toured internationally with Legend Lin Dance Theatre. Through the platform body portal theatre, she works to research and develop the creative potentials of the individual, collective, and environmental bodies we inhabit. She is currently based in Honolulu. www.bodyportaltheatre.com

Shoshana Green is an experimental artist using movement and image to study “process” and “relationships” within and between the quotidian, esoteric and one’s living interiority. She works with the body as a sculptural representation, a mysterious territory of sensations and a channel for giving form to non-verbal narratives. Shoshana is a teacher, curator and presenter for Butoh Programming in San Francisco. She is also a somatic psychotherapist in private practice. www.butohsf.com, shoshanagreentherapy.com

Meenakshi is an emerging multidisciplinary artist who has incorporated experimental video, dance, and sound art in her work.  In her films, she often explores concepts around the interconnectivity of humans and our relationship with nature.  As a sound artist, she frequently mixes electronic sources with live vocals to create a variety of harsh, textural, melodic, and cerebral sonic experiences.  During these times, she seeks to enhance the physicality of sound and bridge the gap between virtual and in-person human experiences.  As a recent graduate of Mills College, she continues to draw from the school’s rich traditions of experimental electronic music as inspiration across all facets of her work.  Meenakshi is elated to be contributing to the local performing arts scene(s) here in Chicago. @mak3shine3

Harlan Rosen performs like a playful kitty, getting stuck in a variety of boxes just for the joy of plotting their escape. As a mover and shaker, they have performed in ensemble works by Tadashi Endo, Joan Laage, Carole McCurdy, Ginger Krebs, and Mitsu Salmon, and have presented their own multimedia performances at Outerspace, Hamlin Park Theater, VHS, No Nation, and Elastic Arts. They live in a rent-controlled anterior temporal nucleus in your head, where they are currently dressed in drag as a duck and trying desperately to yodel.

Hot Mess! is a quarterly series produced by Sara Zalek in partnership with Elastic Arts. View a playlist of past performances: If you are or you know an artist interested in participating, complete this survey to get a sense of your interest and the program. This is a paid opportunity. 

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news Residencies

Chop Wood Carry Water

Chop Wood Carry Water Lo-Fi residency in NW Illinois’ Driftless Region is for thinkers and makers, people who need time away (but not too far) on quiet yet abundantly living land, to think, make, write, build, muse and experiment for a modest cost. 

Applications Due for Spring Session – APRIL 15

There are 16 spots available (two unclaimed Rex Abandon scholarships)

This low residency allows for physical distancing as well as the space for people to choose interaction when desired, allowing focus on your practice and process.

This is not an art residency. We do not expect you to be an artist. We are interested in a larger definition of what it means to think, make, build and collaborate with land, other humans and living beings. We believe edges and categories of what it means to be creative and how we live in this world are meant to be explored and that this is essential for a new coming together within ourselves and between ourselves.

Conversation, moving, studying, walking, biking, kayaking, writing, reading, furniture making, weaving, print making, performing, filming, painting, building, on-site installation, sculpture, ceramics, animation, soil work, dancing, experimentation with and processing of land-based materials have figured largely with past residents.

All genders, sexual orientations, religious beliefs, races, and ethnicities are welcome as Chop Wood Carry Water residents. Applications are to assess if Chop Wood Carry Water lo-fi land-based residency is a good fit for you. There is no jurying of your past work.

For more information email info@socialecologies.net

Categories
news performance events

HOT MESS!

Open Broadcaster Software LIVE Improvising Environment
Saturday, March 5, 2022
@Elastic Arts 3429 W Diversey Ave #208

TWO SETS IRL and live streaming
4:20pm & 8:pm CST 

Featuring:
Yumiko Yoshioka @yumiko-yoshioka (virtually from Tokyo)
Charles Joseph Smith @charlessmith702210
Carole McCurdy @carolemccurdy
Kikù Hibino @kiku.hibino
[⭐️] pronounced “Hypothetical Star”: M_m<M and nulltopia @mmmtvdotnet

Watch our March 5 performance on Twitch for a limited time !
4:20pm show: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1416601071
8pm show: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1416800096

For each set we invited a live audience and live-streamed online. In person audience size depends on Covid conditions, you must be vaccinated and wear a mask inside Elastic Arts.

This series focuses on the moments of co-creation and gives the artists a playful space to discover new ways of working together and interacting with the audience. The performance itself demonstrates the power of working together in the unknown, possibilities for Queering space, and the beauty in re-starting while making art!

Website Event
FB Event
Ticket Link

Categories
butoh teachers news performance events

Eiko Otake in Chicago

Join Eiko and her diverse group of collaborating artists, living and dead, for an investigation into how artists in duet collide, converse, and express what they care about. 

THE DUET PROJECT: DISTANCE I MALLEABLE
Friday and Saturday, February 11-12, 2022 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets: $30 General / $15 Industry / $10 Students
Run time: 60 minutes
Get your tickets! This will likely sell out.
*use Industry22 to get half price tickets*

ADDITIONAL EVENTS
Post-performance discussion following the Friday, February 11 performance

The Duet Project: Distance is Malleable is an interdisciplinary, intergenerational series of duets between Eiko Otake and a diverse group of collaborating artists, living and dead. Collaborators come from different places, times, disciplines, and concerns. These duets will investigate how two artists collide, converse, and express what they care about. The performances at the Dance Center will include choreographer and performer Ishmael Houston-Jones, trans performance maker, writer, and artist Iris McCloughan, and interdisciplinary artist, singer/songwriter, and producer DonChristian Jones as duet partners with the renowned Eiko Otake. Their encounters reaffirm that distance is indeed malleable.

https://dance.colum.edu/events/2022/2/11/eiko-otake-the-duet-project-distance-is-malleable
Friday, February 11 at 7:30pm

More dates through February 12, 2022
Dance Center, Theater
1306 S. Michigan, Chicago, IL, 60605

Categories
butoh teachers butoh workshops news

Spring Training

Coming SOON, Yumiko will be hosting a very special Chicago-style Butoh class, broadcasting live and in person from her home in Tokyo.

March 18-20, 2022
On Zoom
(listed below in Chicago, Honolulu, Tokyo time, dial in from Anywhere)

Register for one, two, or all three classes
Friday in Chicago 8-9:30pm; Honolulu 3-4:30pm;

Tokyo 10-11:30am (Saturday)
Saturday in Chicago 8-9:30pm; Honolulu 3-4:30pm;

Tokyo 10-11:30am (Sunday)
Sunday in Chicago 8-10pm; Honolulu 3-5pm;

Tokyo 10-12pm (Monday)

Three 90 minute classes with an opportunity for Q&A after the third class on March 20.

Yumiko has brought her very unique teaching to us many times in person, and this is her third online class for us during pandemic. We all look forward to the days when she will come again in person. For this set of classes we explore a new idea, won’t you join us?

What is onomatopoeia? (the sound that is the movement, for example, yura yura , puka puka, Aun, papipupepo….)

The word onomatopoeia comes from the combination of two Greek words, one meaning ‘name’ and the other meaning ‘I’ make. So, literally, onomatopoeia means the name (or sound) I make. For example, splat! or boing! Both these words are onomatopoeic and they mean nothing more than what they sound like.

These sounds become both playful and useful tools to deepen and cultivate our body and sensorial awareness.

Belonging to a third generation of Butoh artists, Yumiko has developed a personal style of bodywork called Body Resonance, which integrates Butoh practice with features of Noguchi Taiso gymnastics and various other Asian training methods to help prepare the body to receive and transmit dance and inspirations. Body Resonance starts from the idea that the world, including our body and soul, consists of vibrational waves that create constant resonances like echoes. When we tune our body to that frequency, we receive images, feelings and sensations accordingly. For this to happen, we need first to shake off unnecessary tension. In effect, we make a white canvas of our body to paint new color on it. I teach this as neutralization, encouraging a close-to-zero state, scouring off rust and polishing antenna to catch waves from profound layers of the body. The transformations and concentrations of dancing break up the eggshell of form. They melt down the armor of our ego, allowing resonant memories to emerge from our cells that are floating in the primal liquid of time.

(www.yumiko-yoshioka.com)
Yumiko Yoshioka pushes against the ground with the balls of her feet, facing us in a red tunic, with her head to the side, eyes and mouth open, and her braid pointing downward. Her arms dangle with gravity. Her shadow is a high contrast and behind her is a spray painted cement wall, with bright colors and basic shapes of blue, brown, and red.